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Need Change? Be The Change.

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I put on this shirt FiA yesterday that was created in honor of Charlotte’s Ruth Samuelson to go walk our dog. She must have whispered to me out there! While walking I felt a little voice inside telling me to update this post here and repost on FiAnation.com, our female fitness group.

Was she really whispering to me? With all that is happened the past 2 years in FiA, F3 and our country, I think maybe she was! #PoliPower. We have seen so much change and need change.

With all this change are you inspired to change something?

We are more than half way into 2017. Better get changing.

Why not do a half-time assessment?

To give you some ideas, I wanted to tell you about a conversation on change I had with Ruth.  Ruth was a living example of how “being the change” in small and big ways can positively impact ones family, community and politics.

She was a loving daughter, sister, wife, mom, grandmother, community leader and public servant. Ruth was athletic and loved to workout at 5:15am with her daughter Joy, who we know and love (FiA Santiago) and FiAs. When she suddenly got diagnosed with stage 4 ovarian cancer May 2016, and we found out the cancer had spread, it was a complete shocker to everyone who knew and loved her. Ruth?

Though now gone, I feel she will always be with us in the many lessons she taught, and the good, gutsy and crazy things she did we remember. I personally will always remember her genuineness, that bright smile, willingness to connect and her simple advice.

About 3 years ago, Ruth and I were having lunch together in Charlotte talking about life and change. I was at a crossroads trying to figure out where to best focus my activator type A energy. Should I stay focused on my work and community fitness efforts or launch a female start-up to stop the division in our politics and party? (Ha, ha. I had good intentions!).

When I asked Ruth for some guidance on this, she gazed at me for a pensive moment. You know that gaze if you knew Ruth. She said, “I like that FiA thing.” On stoping division and negativity in this political climate? With her pirate eyes and beautiful smile, she said:

From my experience, you can’t make others change. You have to be the change.

I will always remember this clarifying moment with Ruth. No matter her viewpoint, she was always so calm. So matter of fact. She sure loved ruffling us up by engaging change. She wanted change in her city so she put herself in the arena. She put name on the ballot, got elected, and went into politics where she could get engaged with others to contribute to the change she wanted to see in the community and state.

Unlike Ruth, I was not ready to run for office or to force change.

Force change. Nobody likes that.

Want change? The key is you have to step up in your life to engage change.

It’s like Ruth putting her name on the ballot. One small step forward may lead to dramatic change. So let’s do a half-time assessment:

What line in the sand do you need to step over this weekend to create change?

3 ideas to spark movement:

  • Re-organize your busy life: The days and years fly by really fast! Tomorrow is not guaranteed for any of us. Assess: Are you living the life you imagined or is your life a blur? Get focused and planning. What and who matter most to you? Eliminate the junk and take action on what brings you joy. You will avoid living with regret.
  • Be the life-changer: We are our brothers and sisters keepers right? What positive impact can you make today? Make a decision to turn your pain, anger, frustration or sadness into a mission for change. Look up. Say hello. Be the smile, humor and patience you need. Be the calm in someone’s storm. Be the friend in someone’s loss. Be the mentor in confusion. Be the strength in weakness. Be the light in darkness. Be the bridge to conversation. Be the doer of good we need in this world.
  • Pray it up: As forward focused change agents we need to exercise, pray it up, give thanks, and thenlet it go to avoid the stress that can pull us backwards. Ruth prayed a lot everyday and is probably still praying for us in Heaven. Pray it up to Ruth. She loves to talk! Pray it up to God and your family in Heaven. Have quiet conversations at home, in your car, on a walk, etc. Let God worry about your worries. He is vast. We are so small.

#BeTheChange

Written in honor of #PoliPower #LatiniStrong #CoopStrong #CheechStrong #RapunzelStrong #NashStrong #SydneyStrong #SharretStrong #TaylorStrong #Dadstrong #MomStrong and all you all.

#LiveLoveLead

Fin. Amy Peacock

June 30, 2017

 

How a Friend & Music Got Me Running

“At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.” -Albert Schweitzer

One of my my goals this year is to start thanking the people in my life who lit a spark in me and others.

Today I want to thank my friend Bo, who got me started running.

I was in junior high-school when I first “ran” just to run. In the past the only time I had to run was in soccer.

Just “going for a run” was definitely not on my “to do” list. Never felt the pull.

Yet, I began running because of Bo, my childhood friend and neighbor.

One day as we were chatting after school, he invited me to join him running that weekend. How nice, right?  He must have realized I needed or wanted to lose weight.

That Saturday we met for our first run. It was Bo, his black Sony Walkman, and me.  In his Walkman was a mixed tape of his favorite Led Zeppelin music. We said hello to each-other, then he put the earphones in his ears and off we went.

Uphill. 

Can we stop, I said?

I was out of shape and not a “runner.” I began huffing and puffing. Bo must have sensed my misery! About 5 minutes into our run, he stopped running.

He looked concerned (or maybe just annoyed) then smiled at me.

He took off his earphones and handed them to me along with his Walkman.

“Amy, you gotta listen to music…it will make your run better!”

I took him up on the offer and put the earphones in.

I had heard “Stairway to Heaven” at many school dances (the parents and teachers loved to waltz around slowly to that song), but really never listened to any other Led Zeppelin music.

I figured any music would work to ease the pain of the run! The first song on his playlist was “Black Dog.”

“Hey, hey, mama, said the way you move / Gonna make you sweat, gonna make you groove…”

I started running and it did seem easier.

I survived that day thanks to Bo and Led Zeppelin.

And I am still running today!

Now, every single time I hear a Led Zeppelin song…I feel like I just gotta run!

Crazy.

So, thank you!

You never know what a little kindness can do!

Who knew I would learn to LOVE running?

Who knew I got back to running because of the iPod?

Who knew I would run so many races in so many places?

Who knew I would then go on to teach people how to run and earn money doing it?

And who knew I would own a dog named Finnegan who also loves to run?

The greatest of gratitude to Bo.

Thanks for the spark!

Fin. Amy

Thrive.

A few years ago my husband and I had the great opportunity to meet Dan Buettner who is a world cyclist, adventurer, researcher and author of health books The Blue Zones and Thrive.

His talk was about his research into the healthiest communities in the world.

He started out by asking the audience of 100 adults a powerful question:

“Did you walk or bike to school as a kid?” Every one of us raised our hand.

“Do your kids walk or bike to school now?” Not one person raised their hand.

That got our attention Dan!

His research was inspired by the Danish Twin Studies, among others, which established that only 25% of how long the average person lives is dictated by genes. In other words almost 80% of how long and how well you live is up to you. 

Beginning in 2004 Dan, along with longevity geneticists, medical researchers, anthropologists, demographic scientists, epidemiologists funded by National Geographic, identified pockets of people across the world who live the longest and are the happiest.

Then they went to visit them!

They were searching for evidence-based common denominators among all places.

They termed these healthy pockets “Blue Zones.”

In these Blue Zones they found that people reach age 100 at rates 10 times greater than in the United States! And they have astoundingly low incredible lower rates of cancer, heart disease and diabetes, those big and nasty killers in the US. Here is what else they found.

9 common traits in Blue Zone members:

1. They move naturally all day.

The world’s longest-lived people don’t just pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about.

Think: Do I really need to drive to the library or grocery store? Can I walk or ride a bike? Can I get a stand up desk? Take a walk at lunch outside? Get a dog and walk it?

2. They know their Purpose. 

The Okinawans call it “Ikigai” and the Nicoyans in Costa Rica call it “plan de vida;” for both it translates to “why I wake up in the morning.” Knowing your sense of purpose is worth up to seven years of extra life expectancy!!!

Identify what you are passionate about and pursue it as your purpose daily.

3. They take time to Down Shift.

They experience stress like we do. But they take time to relax every day. Okinawans take a few moments each day in the am to remember their ancestors, Seventh DayAdventists (Lomo Linda, CA) pray, Ikarians (Greece) take a nap and Sardinians (Italy) do happy hour with friends.

Take time to relax, meditate, and give thanks daily. We know stress leads to chronic inflammation which contributes to very major age-related disease. Why feed the monster?

4. They stop eating when they are just 80% full.
“Hara hachi bu” –Is the  Okinawan, 2500-year old Confucian mantra said before meals which reminds Okinawans to stop eating when their stomachs are 80 percent full.

Think. Do you really need that extra helping?

5. They eat a lot of beans and plants.

They have a “Plant Slant.” They eat what they grow too. Vegetables and beans, including fava, black, soy and lentils, are the basics of most centenarian diets. Meat—mostly pork—is eaten on average only five times per month.

Start small: Double daily intake of beans and veggies.

6. They enjoy wine moderately. 

People in all Blue Zones (except Adventists) drink alcohol moderately and regularly with friends and/or with food. Moderate drinkers outlive non-drinkers in these zones. The trick is to drink 1-2 glasses per day (preferably Sardinian Cannonau wine says Dan).

If you can drink just 1 or 2, do.

7. They have a faith-based community. 

All but five of the 263 centenarians they interviewed belonged to some faith-based community. Denomination doesn’t seem to matter. Research shows that attending faith-based services four times per month will add 4-14 years of life expectancy!

We need God and each other. Find a faith community and connect.

8. They put loved ones first. 

Successful centenarians in the Blue Zones put their families first. This means keeping aging parents and grandparents nearby or in the home (It lowers disease and mortality rates of elders and children).  Neighbors of all ages are also active in visiting other families and learning from elders.

Have you talked to or hugged your family lately? Checked in with your neighbor?

9. They have like-minded friends

Dan said,

“The world’s longest lived people chose–or were born into–social circles that supported healthy behaviors, Okinawans created ”moais”–groups of five friends that committed to each other for life.

Research from the Framingham Nurses Studies shows that smoking, obesity, happiness, and even loneliness are contagious. So the social networks of long-lived people have favorably shaped their health behaviors.”

Connect with a healthy, caring tribe daily.

It is so interesting that 6, 7,8 and 9 are all about the power of connecting in community.

Try to apply some of these tips today and let me know how it goes.

Check out Dans new mission – Creating Blue Zones across the US! http://www.bluezones.com/live-happier/thrive-centers/

Fin! Amy

Day 2: Writing a List: Stress Be Gone.

12 Ways to Unpack My Busy Mind 

  1. Thank God for the day ahead.
  2. Workout with FiAnation.com.
  3. Run and walk outside to my music.
  4. Hug my Gordon Setter.
  5. Read and write.
  6. Visit Calm.com for daily guided meditation.
  7. Call or meet a family member or friend.
  8. Light a calming candle and deep breathe when kids whine or fight.
  9. Have a fun family dinner.
  10. Snuggle with kids on sofa and watch a funny show.
  11. Plan with husband on Sunday afternoons.
  12. Hide in my room.

“I” for Inspiration and “E” for Exuberance

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Twenty-Five.” I need these 2 vowels to not be silent today.

“I” for Inspiration:

The #ALSicebucketchallenge.

Last summer, people of all races, ages, abilities, and incomes were inspired by the #ALSIceBucketChallenge (IBC) to dump a bucket of ice on their heads or donate money in the name of ALS …including me!

Some vocal folks thought it was crazy or a fad.

Not me. My mom had ALS….See post: https://carpooldaze.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/come-talk-to-me/)

“E” for Exuberance.

Heart leaping, joy skipping, spirit soaring exuberance is what I felt yesterday in discovering that the IBC has raised over $220 million dollars worldwidesince just last summer. http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/news/2014/12/12/ice-bucket-challenge-has-raised-220-million.html

And…..then the news gets even better.  

The dollars raised are in already in action!

Multidisciplinary ALS clinics that had been previously closed are begin re-opened and re-staffed, new research is being funded, essential patient programs, services, and technology are being re-ignited and delivered. See http://www.alsa.org for details.

Lives are changing.

A simple challenge started in Boston.

Enormous impact worldwide.

Thanks to the Frates family and friends!

Mom's License plate.
Mom’s License plate.

American Sniper “Breathe”

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In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Silver Screen.”


American Sniper: Bradley Cooper

As someone who comes from a military family I want to briefly focus on the movie American Sniper, which has been on my heart and mind since seeing it, and then close with some thoughts on the civilian military divide.

Bradley Cooper’s portrayal of US Navy Seal Chris Kyle is Academy award worthy.

Through Cooper’s studied work (and 8 years supporting the USO), and screen writer Jason Hall and Clint Eastwood’s guidance, they were able to show the rest of us (any controversy aside) a clarifying glimpse of what Chris Kyle, our soldiers, and their families go through at war, and later when they work to assimilate back home.

The precision Cooper displayed in showing Kyle’s incredible mastery of his mind, body and rifle is stunning. His watchful eye (like a hawk), steady body, mindful breathe and quiet patience before shooting (or not) was remarkable. In the movie, whenever he said the simple word “breathe”, my heart-rate shot up and I held my breath, knowing I could never be as steady under such duress.

The care for his family and fellow soldiers was also compelling.

Cooper demonstrated in the movie that separation from families during service is very hard on both parties but the toughest battle often arrives when the soldiers come home.

The soldier’s separation from their mission, their buddies, along with explosive memories of battle and loss, can create a haunting void.

Or, it can allow opportunities for resilience, as we saw with Chris Kyle.

So thanks Bradley Cooper and Clint Eastwood and the brave ones in our media who strive greatly to inform. Thanks to the Kyle family for allowing this movie.  I hope it wins an award, or many. 

Movies like these, and related stories and discussions, will drive us to better understand and support our military and veterans, perhaps closing the divide between us.  

Interestingly, only 0.05% of the American population serves in our military in comparison to 12% in WW11.*  Wow.

US Navy Seal and sniper Chris Kyle was one of those very few and brave Americans who step up to serve their country today.

Just O.5% serve?

This is cause for great pause, awe and utter gratitude.

And then just maybe worth a look in the mirror. What are the rest of us doing for our country? Our communities?

#courage #honor #duty

The fact the soldiers go on multiple deployments is also cause for pause. Just imagine if another 1% of Americans would choose to serve?

How did we get so far removed from serving our country?

How did we get so far away from supporting our military and veterans, in the good and bad?

Or simply putting out an American flag to show our support for the USA – everyday?

As Karl W. Eikenberry, a retired Army lieutenant-general said, “The civilian-military divide erodes the sense of duty that is critical to the health of our democratic republic, where the most important office is that of the citizen. While the armed forces retool for the future, citizens cannot be mere spectators.” *

And as writers Eikenberry and David Kennedy go on to write, “Somehow, soldier and citizen must once again be brought to stand side by side.”

* #courage #honor #duty #serve

*Americans and Their Military Drifting Apart? \http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/27/opinion/americans-and-their-military-drifting-apart.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

Why What a Day blog?

The 2014 Push Onward.

1. Research: I researched leadership, resilience, trust, community, health, anger, positive thinking and the power of the brain to change. Important stuff to share.

2. Mentor: My former English teacher, Dave Sharrett, encouraged me to write.  Not only had Dave and his wife been a huge support when my Dad died, he understood grief at its highest level. He lost his own son, Dave, aka “Bean” to war.

3. Reality: Life is short. Cut to the chase. I participated in the SouthEastern Brain Tumor Foundation Race for Research on the Babes with Brains team for the 3rd time on behalf of Jen Gilberto, my amazing Babe with Brains friend, who has a “piece of shit” brain tumor (see her blog at Greymatterlife.com).  Over the weekend, Jen and I had been discussing transparency, writing and life.  She finally said, “Amy, what are you waiting for? You need to start pressing publish!”

4: Freedom: I heard it yet once again, this time from Ron Carter, President of JCSU: “When you tell your story, it sets you free, and lights the path for others.”

What a day!

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